Other Pages: Main Klarlied Music page | Intro to Popular Music Theory | Next Page | Previous Page

Guitar Chords: Basic nut-position

Prepared by Alan Humm

Chord files color and symbol key

A chord graph
A7 chord graph
Am chord graph
Am7 chord graph
Amaj7 chord graph
B chord graph
B7 chord graph
Bm chord graph
Bm7 chord graph
Bmaj7 chord graph
C chord graph
C7 chord graph
Cm chord graph
Cm7 chord graph
Cmaj7 chord graph
D chord graph
D7 chord graph
Dm chord graph
Dm7 chord graph
Dmaj7 chord graph
E chord graph
E7 chord graph
Em chord graph
Em7 chord graph
Emaj7 chord graph
F chord graph
F7 chord graph
Fm chord graph
Fm7 chord graph
Fmaj7 chord graph
G chord graph
G7 chord graph
Gm chord graph
Gm7 chord graph
Gmaj7 chord graph
Augmented chord graph
Diminished chord graph
1 A regular diminished chord only has three notes, and is used seldom enough that I have not included it (it is formed by removing the note that is two strings over [either direction] from the root in the above chart). Diminished 7th chords either use the regular dominant 7th, or flatten the 7th as well. They are called (respectively) either half-diminished 7th and diminished 7th, or diminished 7th and doubly-diminished 7th, depending on who you ask. To avoid ambiguity I call them (and recommend calling them) half-diminished 7th (7) and doubly-diminished 7th (7), which removes ambiguity. The one above is a doubly-diminished 7th. Technically, the by itself in a chart should be used for the three note version (not 7th), but rarely is. Half-diminished chords are given on the next sheet.

The diminished () and augmented () chords have roots on any of the contained notes, and can be moved up and down the neck to obtain all roots (e.g. F [F augmented] when played up one fret becomes F♯/G♭, A♯/B♭, or D, etc.). What notes are 3rd, 5th, and 7th depend on which note is the root.

There are actually three different kinds of diminished () chords (see the side note for the nerdy details1), but in pop and jazz the one shown here (fully/doubly-diminished 7) is used 99% of the time; if you see it this way (X), it almost always means this form.

 

© 2013 Alan Humm